Tom Olzak

Nyuh-uh… wasn’t me…

In Business Continuity, China, Computers and Internet, Critical Infrastructure, Cyber Espionage, Cyber-warfare on February 20, 2013 at 18:48

Read this article first. Unit In China’s PLA Behind Massive Cyber Espionage Operation: Report | SecurityWeek.Com.

Now we can talk…

It should come as no surprise that China is aggressively hacking into anything it can.  In 2009, Gurmeet Kanwal wrote in the Journal for Defence Studies,

“The Chinese call their pursuit of information warfare and other hi-tech means to counter Washington’s overwhelmingly superior conventional military capabilities “acupuncture warfare”, a term that first surfaced in a 1997 PLA National Defense University publication entitled “On commanding Warfighting under High-Tech Conditions.”  Acupuncture warfare (also called “paralysis warfare”) was described as ‘Paralysing the enemy by attacking the weak link of his command, control, communications and information as if hitting his acupuncture point in kung fu combat.'”

So the Chinese have hacked, wheedled, and otherwise slunk into our national infrastructure.  They seem to be expanding on their initial acupuncture approach with theft of information needed to catch up with or impede Western technical and financial progress.  Of course, the Chinese deny they are anything but victims.

Yes, it is naive to believe we aren’t just as aggressively going after the Chinese.  However, public and private organizations still fail to understand the threat.  In China, the government has no problem applying pressure where needed to protect national infrastructure.  In fact, it is highly probable the Chinese government can disconnect China from the Internet on command.  In both areas, Western nations are at risk.

The path we must take in the West is to force government, financial institutions, utilities, healthcare organizations, and other critical service providers to secure their networks or face severe sanctions.  After all, we can do little about what China sees as behavior in support of its national security.  What we can do is remove the vulnerabilities it exploits and closely monitor for what is obviously continuous malicious activity.  We’ve waited long enough for government and private management to do the right thing.  It’s now time to pick up Teddy’s big stick and domestically whack some heads.

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